Monthly Archives: April 2016

2 posts

Building RPMs on any platform with Maven

In several occasions I had to build RPM packages for installing software. In the past I mostly did it with a Maven build using the RPM Maven Plugin.

The process is simple: At the end of your build you gather up all resources, try to understand the mapping configuration, bang your head a few times in order to figure out way to work with -SNAPSHOT versions and that’s it. In the end you have a few RPM files.

The only problem is, that the plugin actually creates a spec file and runs the rpmbuild command line tool. Which is, of course, only available on an RPM like system. Fortunately Debian/Ubuntu based distributions, although they use something different, provide at least the rpmbuild tool.

On Windows or Mac OS the situation looks different. Adding rpmbuild to Windows can be quite a task. Still the question remains, why this is necessary since Java can run on all platforms.

So time to write a Maven plugin which does not the rpmbuild tool, but create RPM packages native in Java:

de.dentrassi.maven:rpm is a Maven Plugin which does create RPM packages using plain Java as a Maven Plugin. The process is simply and fast and does not require additional command line tool. The plugin is open source and the source code is available on GitHub ctron/rpm-builder.

Writing RPM files … in plain Java

Now creating an RPM file is easy. There are a lot of tutorials out there on how write a SPEC file and build your RPM. Even when you are using Maven … with the exception that when you are on Windows or Mac OS X, the Maven RPM plugin will still try to invoke rpmbuild in order to actually build the RPM file. The maven bundle simply creates a SPEC file, layout out the payload data and lets rpmbuild do the processing.

My task now was to make it possible for Eclipse NeoSCADA to create configuration RPMs directly from inside the Eclipse IDE (running in Java), without the need to have rpmbuild on a Windows platform. Since I did write an RPM reader for Package Drone before, I did know a bit about the RPM file format. So this shouldn’t be a big deal?! … How naive ;-)

Continue reading